Traumatic Brain Injury Research

Traumatic brain injury research at Kessler Foundation explores potential treatments and interventions for deficits in cognition, mobility, and emotional processing.

  • Improving Balance in TBI Using A Low Cost Customized Virtual Reality Rehabilitation Tool

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of a customized balance treatment for people with TBI and balance dysfunction.  

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  • A Randomized Clinical Trial Examining the Efficacy of the Group Administered Modified Story Memory Technique (mSMT) in Persons with Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI)

    The purpose of this research study is to investigate the effectiveness of administering a group memory retraining program in the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) population.  

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  • RehaCom Memory Modules in Moderate to Severe TBI

    The purpose of this rehabilitation research study is to evaluate the effectiveness of "RehaCom," a computerized treatment for memory deficits, delivered in addition to one on one training of memory, to improve verbal memory and memory for people/faces for patients who survived a moderate to sever

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  • Strategy Based Techniques to Enhance Memory (STEM) for Improving New Learning and Memory (NLM) in Moderate to Severe TBI: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    The protocol includes teaching participants how to restructure a memory demanding situation in order to make optimal use of self-generation, spaced learning, and self-testing.

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  • Using Self-Generation to Improve Prospective Memory in Individuals with TBI

    This study seeks to improve prospective memory (PM), or “remembering to remember," a distinct aspect of memory that has been demonstrated to be heavily indicative of a variety of tasks of everyday functioning, including independence in activities of daily living, employment, medication adherence,

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  • Evaluation of a computerized biofeedback based intervention to improve postural control and remedy balance dysfunction in Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Including Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    The purpose of this research study is to assess your ability to sense small changes in movement under your feet while standing and determine if a computerized balance program could improve your balance.

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  • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Menopause - Survey Data Collection

    Researchers are examining menopausal symptoms (e.g., hot flashes, depression, irritability, sleep dysfunction via hot flashes, fatigue via sleep disturbance, etc.) and identifying how these symptoms may also be impacted by traumatic brain injury (TBI).

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  • Pilot Study to Understand the Cortical Changes in Individuals with Brain Injury

    The goal of this project is to understand the cortical activity changes due to loss of motor control in lower extremities as a result of brain injury, and also the gain of motor control due to recovery through robotic rehabilitation.

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  • Keeping an Eye on the Symbol Digit Modalities Test

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between eye movements and the speed someone is able to process information.

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  • Combining Physical and Mental Practice for the Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Movement Impairments Secondary to Traumatic Brain Injury

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  • Northern New Jersey TBI Model Systems

    The purpose of this study is to provide information which may help improve the treatment, care, and outcomes of people with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

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  • Home-based Arm & Hand Exercise in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether a home-based arm & hand exercise program improves functions of the upper limb in people with TBI.

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  • Emotional Processing in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

     This study examines the effect of an emotional processing training program in individuals with TBI.

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