press release banner

Study Defines Risk Factors for Unemployment in Working People with Multiple Sclerosis

Head shot of Dr. Lauren Strober

Lauren Strober, PhD, of Kessler Foundation reports on first prospective study of employment in multiple sclerosis, identifying factors and behaviors that may be targets for interventions to maintain employment

East Hanover, NJ. October 05, 2020. Lauren Strober, PhD, at Kessler Foundation recently published results of the first prospective study of employment and multiple sclerosis (MS). Dr. Strober compared two groups of individuals with MS – those ‘at risk’ and ‘not at risk’ for unemployment, examining the influences of multiple factors on the likelihood of staying in the workplace. The article, "Determinants of unemployment in multiple sclerosis (MS): The role of disease measures, person-specific factors, and engagement in positive health-related behaviors” was epublished on September 2, 2020 by Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders.

Link to abstract: https://tinyurl.com/y4gvyljc

Multiple sclerosis affects people aged 20 to 50 years, comprising the peak working years. More than 90% are in the workforce at the time of their diagnosis, but on average, only 30% to 45% are employed after diagnosis. Unemployment has a negative impact on individuals and their families, as well as on society, in terms of lost productivity. Moreover, there are several physical and mental health “costs” associated with one becoming unemployed. Examining the factors that contribute to individuals with MS leaving the workforce is essential to identifying people at risk, and finding ways to help them maintain employment.   

For this prospective study, 252 individuals with MS aged 20 to 64, who were working full- or part-time, were recruited through the national and local chapters of the National MS Society. A survey administered at the outset of the study identified 67 participants at risk for unemployment, defined as considering reducing their hours or leaving their jobs in the near future. The ‘at risk’ and ‘not at risk’ groups were compared by disease measures, person-specific factors, and health-related behaviors.

“Individuals at risk tended to have progressive disease, more fatigue, poorer coping mechanisms, and less MS self-efficacy,” reported Dr. Strober, senior research scientist in the Center for Neuropsychology and Neuroscience Research at Kessler Foundation. “They were also less likely to report engaging in positive behaviors such as healthful diets, exercise, and social and intellectual activities.”

“Risk of unemployment is highest during the first three to five years after diagnosis, so we need to be able to intervene early to prevent job losses, and their subsequent impact on physical and mental health, as well as on personal and family finances. This study points to factors related to risk of unemployment that may be amenable to early intervention,” said Dr. Strober. “While further research is needed, professionals who provide MS care should be aware of the potential impact of this diagnosis on future employment, and be prepared to intervene before individuals leave the work force.”    

Funding: National Institutes of Health Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (K23HD069494).

Listen to Dr. Strober talk about this study

 

About MS Research at Kessler Foundation

Kessler Foundation's cognitive rehabilitation research in MS is funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research, National MS Society, Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers, the Patterson Trust, Biogen Idec, Hearst Foundations, the International Progressive MS Alliance, and Kessler Foundation. Under the leadership of John DeLuca, PhD, senior VP for Research & Training, and Nancy Chiaravalloti, PhD, director of the Centers for Neuropsychology, Neuroscience and Traumatic Brain Injury Research, scientists have made important contributions to the knowledge of cognitive decline in MS and developed new treatments. Clinical studies span new learning, memory, executive function, attention and processing speed, emotional processing, employment, cognitive fatigue, and the interaction of cognitive and physical deficits. Research tools include exercise regimens, innovative applications of neuroimaging, mobile imaging technologies, eye tracking, robotics, and virtual reality. Neuroimaging studies are conducted at the research-dedicated Rocco Ortenzio Neuroimaging Center at Kessler Foundation. Kessler researchers and clinicians have faculty appointments in the department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School; selected staff are affiliated faculty with NJIT.

About Kessler Foundation

Kessler Foundation, a major nonprofit organization in the field of disability, is a global leader in rehabilitation research that seeks to improve cognition, mobility and long-term outcomes, including employment, for people with neurological disabilities caused by diseases and injuries of the brain and spinal cord. Kessler Foundation leads the nation in funding innovative programs that expand opportunities for employment for people with disabilities. For more information, visit KesslerFoundation.org.

Stay connected

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | SoundCloud

For more information, or to interview an expert,

Contact: Carolann Murphy, 973.324.8382, CMurphy@KesslerFoundation.org

 

 

Submitted by nmiller on Mon, 10/05/2020 - 15:33