Current Studies

The following are studies currently being done at RONIC:

Spine DTI Study

This study aims to take images of the spinal cord and compare the changes occurring during the healing process after an acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Participants have an initial baseline scan, and four follow up scans over a six month period.
By participating in this study, you help scientists and doctors understand the healing process after a spinal cord injury. Understanding this healing process is essential to improving treatments for individuals with SCI.

To participate in this study, you must be between the ages of 18 and 75 and have a recent Spinal Cord Injury, or you may participate as a healthy volunteer.

EEG-fMRI Study

Fatigue is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). It involves a lack of both mental and physical energy, which can make it difficult to complete tasks. To better understand what causes fatigue in MS, this study looks in depth at two different kinds of fatigue: physical (muscle exhaustion) and cognitive (difficulty with attention, focus, and motivation). 

Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) are two powerful tools for studying the brain. We use these methods to examine how the brain responds to tasks involving physical and cognitive fatigue. The findings will help us understand the roles of physical and cognitive fatigue in MS, as well as how these two types of fatigue interact with each other. By participating in this study, you will be contributing to research that could lead to more effective treatments for fatigue.

To participate in this study, you must be between the ages of 30 and 65 and have Relapsing-Remitting type of MS, or participate as a healthy volunteer. 

Cognitive Fatigue in MS Study

Over 90% of individuals with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have symptoms of fatigue. Cognitive fatigue is a type of overwhelming mental exhaustion that makes focusing on tasks especially difficult. Research has shown that a deep part of the brain, called the basal ganglia, plays an important role in cognitive fatigue. This area is also related to abnormal iron levels in the brain.

This study examines how abnormal levels of brain iron relate to cognitive fatigue symptoms in MS. Brain imaging techniques make it possible to measure the amount of iron inside certain brain areas. We are studying fatigue symptoms and brain iron levels in individuals with MS and in healthy volunteers. By participating in this study, you will help us better understand these symptoms, and develop effective treatments for cognitive fatigue in MS.

To participate in this study, you must be between the ages of 30 and 65 and have Relapsing-Remitting type of MS, or you may participate as a healthy volunteer.

 

Please contact our Research Coordinator if you are interested in participating in any of our studies:

Sarah Wood

973-324-3506

SWood@kesslerfoundation.org